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Автор Тема: John G. Nicholls, автор книги "От нейрона к мозгу" дает лекцию в Хельсинки  (Прочитано 3228 раз)

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Prof. John G. Nicholls
from SISSA (International School for Advanced Studies)

will give two lectures on Friday, June 18 at Biomedicum and here in Viikki, Cultivator II:

Friday, June 18, 2004

11:00 at Biomedicum, Haartmaninkatu 8, Lecture Hall 1
"Contributions of basic neuroscience to clinical neurology"

14:00 Cultivator II, Viikki, seminar room B105
"Why does the spinal cord not regenerate after injury?"

After the second talk, Prof. Nicholls is inviting students to stay in room B105 for an informal discussion about science, problems etc. Please take this unique chance to meet this renowned scholar and excellent teacher!


John G. Nicholls is Professor of Biophysics at the International School for Advanced Studies in Trieste. He was born in London in 1929 and received a medical degree from Charing Cross Hospital and a PhD in physiology from the Department of Biophysics at University College London, where he did research under the direction of Sir Bernard Katz. He has worked at University College London, at Oxford, Harvard, Yale and Stanford Universities and at the Biocenter in Basel. With Stephen Kuffler, he made experiments on neuroglial cells and wrote the first edition of the book “From Neuron to Brain”. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, a member of the Mexican Academy of Medicine and the recipient of the Venezuelan Order of Andres Bello. He has given laboratory and lecture courses in neurobiology at Woods Hole and Cold Spring Harbor, and in universities in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Chile, China, India, Israel, Malaysia, Mexico, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Uruguay and Venezuela. His work concerns regeneration of the nervous system after injury, which he studied first in an invertebrate, the leech, and recently in immature
mammalian spinal cord.